Recent Articles https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss Recent Articles for Department of Plant Sciences en Seeing Plants in Three Dimensions https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/seeing-plants-three-dimensions <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Seeing Plants in Three Dimensions</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 18, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0213.2d%20for%20new%20blog%20feature%20image.jpg?h=350cc808&amp;itok=3ZPmfHSg" width="1280" height="720" alt="Image of a modeled plant" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="Scientists are taking a new look at the inner workings of plants by imaging and modeling them in three dimensions. “We’ve realized tremendous advances in technology for 3-D imaging of leaves,” said Tom Buckley, assistant professor in Plant Sciences at UC Davis. Recent developments are summarized in an article in Trends in Plant Sciences, which sprang from a 2017 workshop at the University of Sydney organized by Buckley and Professor Margaret Barbour, University of Sydney. Buckley uses mathematical and computer modeling to study how plants respond to their environment, especially how water moves through leaves. That sounds small-scale, but how water moves through leaves controls how water moves through forests and that controls how water moves between the ground and the atmosphere. “It impacts our models of water and carbon exchange in the landscape,” Buckley said. Plant scientists are getting new insight by imaging and modeling leaves in three dimensions. (image: University of Sydney)Plants control water flow by opening or closing tiny holes in leaves called stomata. When plants are water-stressed, the stomata close to conserve water. But this also stops carbon dioxide from entering the leaf, limiting photosynthesis and plant growth. Many of us learnt about stomata in high school biology, but there’s still no complete model for how they respond to environmental changes, Buckley said. Buckley’s research has shown that there are problems with how scientists quantify water movement. Existing models account for factors like osmosis and gravity, but do not take into account the movement of water vapor due to changes in temperature, he said. Three-dimensional modeling and imaging is enabling Buckley and his international colleagues to quantify these differences, and this feeds back to other calculations — from leaves up to entire forests.   More information Embracing 3D Complexity in Leaf Carbon–Water Exchange (Trends in Plant Sciences) 3D imaging opens door to better understanding of fascinating leaf complexity (University of Sydney news release) (Article from Egghead blog, October 17, 2018, by Andy Fell, UC Davis News and Media Relations)"> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Scientists are taking a new look at the inner workings of plants by imaging and modeling them in three dimensions. “We’ve realized tremendous advances in technology for 3-D imaging of leaves,” said Tom Buckley, assistant professor in Plant Sciences at UC Davis." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Scientists are taking a new look at the inner workings of plants by imaging and modeling them in three dimensions.</p> <p>“We’ve realized tremendous advances in technology for 3-D imaging of leaves,” said <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/people/thomas-buckley">Tom Buckley</a>, assistant professor in <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">Plant Sciences</a> at UC Davis.</p> <p>Recent developments are summarized in an article in <em><a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2018.09.005">Trends in Plant Sciences</a></em>, which sprang from a 2017 workshop at the University of Sydney organized by Buckley and Professor Margaret Barbour, University of Sydney.</p> <p>Buckley uses mathematical and computer modeling to study how plants respond to their environment, especially how water moves through leaves. That sounds small-scale, but how water moves through leaves controls how water moves through forests and that controls how water moves between the ground and the atmosphere.</p> <p>“It impacts our models of water and carbon exchange in the landscape,” Buckley said.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img"><img alt="Image of a modeled plant" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="05d7d290-76c7-449c-9ab7-44ee12ec778a" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0213.2a%20183273_web-768x1006.jpg" /><figcaption>Plant scientists are getting new insight by imaging and modeling leaves in three dimensions. (image: University of Sydney)</figcaption></figure><p>Plants control water flow by opening or closing tiny holes in leaves called stomata. When plants are water-stressed, the stomata close to conserve water. But this also stops carbon dioxide from entering the leaf, limiting photosynthesis and plant growth. Many of us learnt about stomata in high school biology, but there’s still no complete model for how they respond to environmental changes, Buckley said.</p> <p>Buckley’s research has shown that there are problems with how scientists quantify water movement. Existing models account for factors like osmosis and gravity, but do not take into account the movement of water vapor due to changes in temperature, he said. Three-dimensional modeling and imaging is enabling Buckley and his international colleagues to quantify these differences, and this feeds back to other calculations — from leaves up to entire forests.</p> <div class="responsive-embed" style="padding-bottom: 56.25%"><iframe width="480" height="270" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BsbMxnx9WH0?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p><strong>More information</strong></p> <p><a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2018.09.005">Embracing 3D Complexity in Leaf Carbon–Water Exchange</a> (<em>Trends in Plant Sciences</em>)</p> <p><a href="https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-10/uos-3io101518.php">3D imaging opens door to better understanding of fascinating leaf complexity</a> (<em>University of Sydney news release</em>)</p> <p>(<em>Article from <a href="http://blogs.ucdavis.edu/egghead/2018/10/17/seeing-plants-three-dimensions/">Egghead blog</a>, October 17, 2018, by <a href="http://strategiccommunications.ucdavis.edu/about/news/fell.html">Andy Fell</a>, UC Davis <a href="http://strategiccommunications.ucdavis.edu/about/news/index.html">News and Media Relations</a></em>)</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/modeling" hreflang="en">Modeling</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/modeling" hreflang="en">Modeling</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/technology" hreflang="en">Technology</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/water-0" hreflang="en">Water</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/multimedia" hreflang="en">Multimedia</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 18 Oct 2018 15:33:10 +0000 Ann Filmer 13276 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu Change on the Range: Is a New Generation of Young, Female Ranchers Ready to Adapt to Climate Change? https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/change-range-new-generation-young-female-ranchers-ready-adapt-climate-change <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Change on the Range: Is a New Generation of Young, Female Ranchers Ready to Adapt to Climate Change?</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 16, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0212.02a%20new-ranchers-climate-change-uc-davis.jpg?h=c74750f6&amp;itok=65wMGBVH" width="1280" height="720" alt="Female rancher in field" title="First-generation grazier Ariel Greenwood manages cattle and land on Freestone Ranch in Sonoma County. UC Davis graduate student Kate Munden-Dixon is surveying new rangeland managers like Greenwood to make sure they have the resources they need to thrive. (photo Brittany App/Brittany App Photography)" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="A new breed of ranchers is bringing diverse demographics and unique needs to rangeland management in California. These first-generation ranchers are often young, female and less likely to, in fact, own a ranch. But like more traditional rangeland managers, this new generation holds a deep love for the lifestyle and landscapes that provide a wealth of public benefit to California and the world. Ariel Greenwood and Erin Kiley, first-generation graziers in the Bay Area, California. (photo Elaine Patarini) Ariel Greenwood checks fences with a horse named Frog. (photo Sam Ryerson)   &quot;When first-generation ranchers succeed, we all succeed,&quot; says Kate Munden-Dixon, a Ph.D. student working with Leslie Roche, Cooperative Extension rangeland specialist with the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences. Paigelynn Trotter of Sweetgrass Grazing. (photo Ariel Greenwood)   Munden-Dixon and Roche recently discovered that many new livestock managers aren’t plugged into information networks such as UC Cooperative Extension and rancher coalitions that provide science and strategies for making sustainable rangeland management decisions. This lack of connection can make first-generation ranchers more vulnerable when dealing with challenges like drought and climate variability, according to their study findings, which was recently published in Rangeland Journal. To help bridge the gap, Munden-Dixon landed a $25,000 Graduate Student Grant from Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education, a USDA program, to reach out to new ranchers and rangeland managers. Cattle in the hills of Bodega Bay, California (photo Ariel Greenwood)   Why rangelands matter More than one half of California — 38 million acres — is rangeland that provides open space, healthy watersheds, carbon storage, food, fiber and habitat for diverse plants and wildlife. UC Davis research indicates grasslands and rangeland have become more resilient at sequestering or consuming carbon dioxide pollution than forests in California, making them especially important in a warming world. But rangeland and livestock production are at risk because more rangeland is being converted to housing and crop production. The average age of ranchers in California is 62, and fewer children are taking over the family ranch. Enter a new wave of rangeland managers. Many of these young ranchers don’t yet have access to the capital required to purchase land and large head of cattle and other livestock. Instead, they often contract with public and private landowners to graze goats, sheep and cattle to restore landscapes and reduce fire vegetation. A horse and rider at E-L Ranch in Sonoma County. (photo Ariel Greenwood)   “What we really need is support in connecting land and contract opportunities,” says Brittany Cole Bush, an “urban shepherdess” and former contract sheep and goat grazier. She now consults with land owners and public agencies from her home base in Southern California. “We need market research that shows the value that grazing brings to fire abatement, soil conservation and so much more. Market research would increase our value and help us become viable players.” More than one half of California is rangeland that provides open space, healthy watersheds, carbon storage, food, fiber, and habitat for diverse plants and wildlife. (photo Ariel Greenwood)   Expanding Extension Munden-Dixon is interviewing 40 new rangeland managers from across California to explore how decision-making by different demographics influences adaption to climate change and quality of life. Munden-Dixon and her team are also hosting workshops to make sure Cooperative Extension specialists understand and can respond to all ranchers’ needs. Sam Ryerson and Ariel Greenwood, first-generation graziers and land stewards. (photo Ariel Greenwood)   “There is both a need and opportunity for a new generation of livestock managers that is able to adapt to California’s changing climate,” Munden-Dixon says. “This next generation may not look like your typical rancher, so we want to ensure organizations are helping all ranchers succeed, regardless of their demographics or land tenure.” Human ecology Ph.D. student Kate Munden-Dixon, at UC Davis, is interviewing first-generation ranchers to make sure they have the resources they need. (photo Brittany App/Brittany App Photography)   The power of connection Munden-Dixon would like to become a Cooperative Extension specialist herself one day. Working with first-generation ranchers reminds her that collaboration and public engagement are critical to addressing issues in sustainable agriculture. “There is no one answer or single expert when it comes to building healthy food systems,” Munden-Dixon says. “We find solutions when we work together.” (This story, written by Diane Nelson, was originally published in the Fall/Winter 2018 issue of Outlook, a magazine from the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)  "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "A new breed of ranchers is bringing diverse demographics and unique needs to rangeland management in California. These first-generation ranchers are often young, female and less likely to, in fact, own a ranch. But like more traditional rangeland managers, this new generation holds a deep love for the lifestyle and landscapes that provide a wealth of public benefit to California and the world." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A new breed of ranchers is bringing diverse demographics and unique needs to rangeland management in California. These first-generation ranchers are often young, female and less likely to, in fact, own a ranch. But like more traditional rangeland managers, this new generation holds a deep love for the lifestyle and landscapes that provide a wealth of public benefit to California and the world.</p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="478" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.03a-two-female-ranchers-climate-change-uc-davis-644x478.jpg" width="644" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>Ariel Greenwood and Erin Kiley, first-generation graziers in the Bay Area, California. (photo Elaine Patarini)</em></p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="482" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.04a-mending-fences-new-ranchers-climate-change-uc-davis-644x482.jpg" width="644" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>Ariel Greenwood checks fences with a horse named Frog. (photo Sam Ryerson)</em></p> <p> </p> <p>"When first-generation ranchers succeed, we all succeed," says Kate Munden-Dixon, a Ph.D. student working with <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/people/leslie-roche">Leslie Roche</a>, Cooperative Extension rangeland specialist with the UC Davis <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">Department of Plant Sciences</a>.</p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="482" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.05a-one-female-rancher-climate-change-uc-davis-644x482.jpg" width="644" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>Paigelynn Trotter of Sweetgrass Grazing. (photo Ariel Greenwood)</em></p> <p> </p> <p>Munden-Dixon and Roche recently discovered that many new livestock managers aren’t plugged into information networks such as UC Cooperative Extension and rancher coalitions that provide science and strategies for making sustainable rangeland management decisions. This lack of connection can make first-generation ranchers more vulnerable when dealing with challenges like drought and climate variability, according to their study findings, which was <a href="https://www.publish.csiro.au/RJ/RJ18023">recently published </a>in <em>Rangeland Journal.</em></p> <p>To help bridge the gap, Munden-Dixon landed a $25,000 Graduate Student Grant from Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education, a USDA program, to reach out to new ranchers and rangeland managers.</p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="483" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.06a-cows-new-ranchers-climate-change-uc-davis-644x483.jpg" width="644" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>Cattle in the hills of Bodega Bay, California (photo Ariel Greenwood)</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Why rangelands matter </strong></p> <p>More than one half of California — 38 million acres — is rangeland that provides open space, healthy watersheds, carbon storage, food, fiber and habitat for diverse plants and wildlife. <a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/news/grasslands-more-reliable-carbon-sink-than-trees/">UC Davis research indicates</a> grasslands and rangeland have become more resilient at sequestering or consuming carbon dioxide pollution than forests in California, making them especially important in a warming world.</p> <p>But rangeland and livestock production are at risk because more rangeland is being converted to housing and crop production. The average age of ranchers in California is 62, and fewer children are taking over the family ranch.</p> <p>Enter a new wave of rangeland managers. Many of these young ranchers don’t yet have access to the capital required to purchase land and large head of cattle and other livestock. Instead, they often contract with public and private landowners to graze goats, sheep and cattle to restore landscapes and reduce fire vegetation.</p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="483" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.07a-range-new-ranchers-climate-change-uc-davis-644x483.jpg" width="644" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>A horse and rider at E-L Ranch in Sonoma County. (photo Ariel Greenwood)</em></p> <p> </p> <p>“What we really need is support in connecting land and contract opportunities,” says Brittany Cole Bush, an “urban shepherdess” and former contract sheep and goat grazier. She now consults with land owners and public agencies from her home base in Southern California. “We need market research that shows the value that grazing brings to fire abatement, soil conservation and so much more. Market research would increase our value and help us become viable players.”</p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="443" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.08a-dog-herding-cows-new-ranchers-climate-change-uc-davis-644x443.jpg" width="644" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>More than one half of California is rangeland that provides open space, healthy watersheds, carbon storage, food, fiber, and habitat for diverse plants and wildlife. (photo Ariel Greenwood)</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Expanding Extension</strong></p> <p>Munden-Dixon is interviewing 40 new rangeland managers from across California to explore how decision-making by different demographics influences adaption to climate change and quality of life. Munden-Dixon and her team are also hosting workshops to make sure Cooperative Extension specialists understand and can respond to all ranchers’ needs.</p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="486" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.09a-researchers-ranchers-climate-change-uc-davis-644x486.jpg" width="644" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>Sam Ryerson and Ariel Greenwood, first-generation graziers and land stewards. (photo Ariel Greenwood)</em></p> <p> </p> <p>“There is both a need and opportunity for a new generation of livestock managers that is able to adapt to California’s changing climate,” Munden-Dixon says. “This next generation may not look like your typical rancher, so we want to ensure organizations are helping all ranchers succeed, regardless of their demographics or land tenure.”</p> <p class="indent"><img alt="" height="528" src="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/0212.10a-Kate-Munden-Dixon-climate-change-uc-davis-644x679.jpg" width="500" /></p> <p class="indent"><em>Human ecology Ph.D. student Kate Munden-Dixon, at UC Davis, is interviewing first-generation ranchers to make sure they have the resources they need. (photo Brittany App/Brittany App Photography)</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The power of connection </strong></p> <p>Munden-Dixon would like to become a Cooperative Extension specialist herself one day. Working with first-generation ranchers reminds her that collaboration and public engagement are critical to addressing issues in sustainable agriculture.</p> <p>“There is no one answer or single expert when it comes to building healthy food systems,” Munden-Dixon says. “We find solutions when we work together.”</p> <p>(<em>This story, written by Diane Nelson, was originally published in the <a href="https://ucdavis.github.io/caes3dissue/Outlook-Fall18/">Fall/Winter 2018 issue of Outlook</a></em>,<em> a magazine from the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.</em>)</p> <p> </p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/range-management" hreflang="en">Range management</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agriculture" hreflang="en">Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/animal-science" hreflang="en">Animal science</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/conservation" hreflang="en">Conservation</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/natural-resources" hreflang="en">Natural resources</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/range-management" hreflang="en">Range management</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students-and-education" hreflang="en">Students and education</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 16 Oct 2018 17:43:23 +0000 Ann Filmer 13256 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu Downy Mildew Research to Benefit Lettuce Growers and Consumers: Funds Will Support Genomics Research for $3 Billion Crop https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/downy-mildew-research-benefit-lettuce-growers-and-consumers-funds-will-support-genomics <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Downy Mildew Research to Benefit Lettuce Growers and Consumers: Funds Will Support Genomics Research for $3 Billion Crop</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">October 15, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0211.4b%20resize%20for%20full%20image%20on%20news%20blog.jpg?h=99b95e68&amp;itok=jyukaq84" width="1280" height="720" alt="Downy mildew on lettuce" title="Downy mildew on lettuce. (photo UC Regents)" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="Quick Summary Downy mildew is the most economically important pathogen infecting lettuce Research to benefit conventional and organic farmers and reduce crop loss Research will provide consumers food grown using fewer chemicals Researchers at the University of California, Davis, will use the genomics of lettuce to combat a pathogen that causes losses in the $3 billion industry each year. The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, or FFAR, awarded Richard Michelmore, professor of Plant Sciences and director of the UC Davis Genome Center, the first research grant through the Crops of the Future Collaborative. UC Davis will receive $2.5 million from FFAR and matching funds from the Crops of the Future Leafy Greens Participants for a total of $5 million. The award will allow researchers to exploit genomics approaches to combat downy mildew, which is the most economically important pathogen infecting lettuce. The highly variable pathogen can cause losses in the field and after harvest.  “Downy mildew threatens production wherever the lettuce crop is grown, requiring expensive chemical control measures and resulting in loss of quality for consumers,” said Michelmore. Professor Richard Michelmore, UC Davis.The project will enable rational deployment of new resistance genes resulting in more durable disease resistance and less use of control chemicals. The research will benefit both conventional and organic farmers by reducing crop losses and improving profitability. It also will help reduce food waste and provide consumers food that has been produced using fewer chemicals. “FFAR’s investment will increase our knowledge of plant resistance and pathogen variability leading to more efficient, knowledge-driven breeding of lettuce cultivars with more durable resistance to downy mildew,” said Michelmore. The matching funds are provided by a multinational consortium of 14 large and small breeding and biotechnology companies in order to address significant problems in lettuce production.  “This award is an example of how public-private partnerships effectively leverage funding for research that will provide benefit to farmers, producers, and consumers,” said Sally Rockey, executive director of FFAR. “This consortium approach provides smaller companies an exceptional opportunity to combine their R&amp;D resources with larger multinationals to address shared pre-competitive issues important to the lettuce industry.” Crops of the Future Leafy Greens Participants include: BASF Vegetable Seeds, Bejo Zaden B.V., Benson Hill Biosytems, Inc., Enza Zaden Research and Development, B.V., Gautier Semences, Keygene, N.V., Progeny Advanced Genetics Inc., Ramiro Arnedo S.A., Rijk Zwaan Zaadteelt en Zaadhandel B.V., Sakata Seed Corporation, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Takii and Company Ltd., Tanimura &amp; Antle Value Added LLC., and Vilmorin S.A. Media contacts: ·         Amy Quinton, UC Davis News and Media Relations, 530-752-9843, cell 530-601-8077, amquinton@ucdavis.edu ·         Sarah Goldberg, Foundation of Food and Agriculture Research, 202-624-0704, sgoldberg@foundationfar.org [article by Amy Quinton, News and Media Relations, UC Davis] "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Quick Summary Downy mildew is the most economically important pathogen infecting lettuce Research to benefit conventional and organic farmers and reduce crop loss Research will provide consumers food grown using fewer chemicals Researchers at the University of California, Davis, will use the genomics of lettuce to combat a pathogen that causes losses in the $3 billion industry each year." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="MsoNormal"><strong><span>Quick Summary</span></strong></p> <ul type="disc"><li><span>Downy mildew is the most economically important pathogen infecting lettuce</span></li> <li><span>Research to benefit conventional and organic farmers and reduce crop loss</span></li> <li><span>Research will provide consumers food grown using fewer chemicals </span></li> </ul><p class="MsoNormal"><span>Researchers at the University of California, Davis, will use the genomics of lettuce to combat a pathogen that causes losses in the $3 billion industry each year.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, or FFAR, awarded <a href="http://michelmorelab.ucdavis.edu/">Richard Michelmore</a>, professor of <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">Plant Sciences</a> and director of the UC Davis <a href="http://genomecenter.ucdavis.edu/">Genome Center</a>, the first research grant through the <a href="https://foundationfar.org/cotf/">Crops of the Future Collaborative</a>.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>UC Davis will receive $2.5 million from FFAR and matching funds from the Crops of the Future Leafy Greens Participants for a total of $5 million.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>The award will allow researchers to exploit genomics approaches to combat downy mildew, which is the most economically important pathogen infecting lettuce. The highly variable pathogen can cause losses in the field and after harvest. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“Downy mildew threatens production wherever the lettuce crop is grown, requiring expensive chemical control measures and resulting in loss of quality for consumers,” said Michelmore.</span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Professor Richard Michelmore, UC Davis." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="71d3f8b0-5312-4130-bdaa-b9af5a16fa6c" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0211.5b%20resize%20to%20300px.jpg" /><figcaption>Professor Richard Michelmore, UC Davis.</figcaption></figure><p class="MsoNormal"><span>The project will enable rational deployment of new resistance genes resulting in more durable disease resistance and less use of control chemicals. The research will benefit both conventional and organic farmers by reducing crop losses and improving profitability. It also will help reduce food waste and provide consumers food that has been produced using fewer chemicals.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“FFAR’s investment will increase our knowledge of plant resistance and pathogen variability leading to more efficient, knowledge-driven breeding of lettuce cultivars with more durable resistance to downy mildew,” said Michelmore.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>The matching funds are provided by a multinational consortium of 14 large and small breeding and biotechnology companies in order to address significant problems in lettuce production. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“This award is an example of how public-private partnerships effectively leverage funding for research that will provide benefit to farmers, producers, and consumers,” said Sally Rockey, executive director of FFAR. “This consortium approach provides smaller companies an exceptional opportunity to combine their R&amp;D resources with larger multinationals to address shared pre-competitive issues important to the lettuce industry.”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Crops of the Future Leafy Greens Participants include: BASF Vegetable Seeds, Bejo Zaden B.V., Benson Hill Biosytems, Inc., Enza Zaden Research and Development, B.V., Gautier Semences, Keygene, N.V., Progeny Advanced Genetics Inc., Ramiro Arnedo S.A., Rijk Zwaan Zaadteelt en Zaadhandel B.V., Sakata Seed Corporation, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Takii and Company Ltd., Tanimura &amp; Antle Value Added LLC., and Vilmorin S.A.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><span>Media contacts:</span></strong></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst"><span><span>·<span>         </span></span></span><span><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/person/articles/23463"><span>Amy Quinton</span></a>, UC Davis News and Media Relations, 530-752-9843, cell 530-601-8077, <a href="mailto:amquinton@ucdavis.edu">amquinton@ucdavis.edu</a></span></p> <p class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast"><span><span>·<span>         </span></span></span><span><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/person/articles/24905"><span>Sarah Goldberg</span></a>, Foundation of Food and Agriculture Research, 202-624-0704, <a href="mailto:sgoldberg@foundationfar.org">sgoldberg@foundationfar.org</a></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/downy-mildew-research-benefit-lettuce-growers-and-consumers">article</a> by </em><em><span><a href="http://strategiccommunications.ucdavis.edu/about/news/quinton.html">Amy Quinton</a>, <a href="http://strategiccommunications.ucdavis.edu/about/news/index.html">News and Media Relations</a>, UC Davis</span></em><span>] </span></p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/diseases-plants" hreflang="en">Diseases of plants</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agriculture" hreflang="en">Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/awards-and-rankings" hreflang="en">Awards and rankings</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/diseases-plants" hreflang="en">Diseases of plants</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/genomics" hreflang="en">Genomics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/vegetable-crops" hreflang="en">Vegetable crops</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 15 Oct 2018 16:59:55 +0000 Ann Filmer 13251 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu The pitfalls of FDA’s GMO food labeling https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/pitfalls-fdas-gmo-food-labeling <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">The pitfalls of FDA’s GMO food labeling</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 27, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0210.2c%201000%20px%20wide%2C%20resize.jpg?h=27d057f9&amp;itok=uFxgBikJ" width="1280" height="720" alt="Fresh fruits and vegetables" title="(photo: Ann Filmer/UC Davis)" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="[This op-ed, by Professor Kent Bradford, Director of the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis, is reprinted from The Hill, September 24, 2018] Some companies in California were surprised recently when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates food labeling, announced that it was considering no longer allowing food products to be labeled as “milk” unless they came from lactating animals.  Almond “milk” has become increasingly popular with consumers and essentially all almonds in the U.S. are grown in California. The state also leads the U.S. in milk production, and dairy interests applauded the FDA move, as they view plant-derived “milk” as piggybacking on the efforts they have made to convince the public of the health benefits of consuming milk, cheese, yogurt and other dairy products. Kent Bradford, Distinguished Professor in Plant Sciences, and Director of the Seed Biotechnology Center, UC Davis.Regardless of these contrasting consequences for key California products, the proposal is consistent with FDA labeling regulations designed to prevent misleading consumers. For example, it is not legal to label plant products as being “cholesterol free,” because plants don’t produce cholesterol. All plant products are cholesterol free, so it is misleading to label some of them that way, as it implies that other plant products not labeled as cholesterol free might contain the compound. At a minimum, advertising a plant product as being cholesterol free implies that some plant products do contain cholesterol, which is false. This consumer protection principle will soon be tested across a much wider range of products. Following a law passed by Congress in 2016, the federal Agricultural Marketing Service is devising guidelines for mandatory labeling of food products developed using some specific crop breeding methods. These include improving crops using methods to give them specific characteristics directly, such as the ability to ward off insects without pesticide applications or to require less fertilizer or water, rather than requiring years of development. Even though crops bred using these methods have been grown widely for over 20 years without any harm to consumers, these “Genetically Modified Organism” (GMO) labels or symbols will soon be required on foods in the U.S. in the interest of the consumers’ right to know what is in their foods. As labeling of GMO foods was not required previously, the Non-GMO Project has promoted its butterfly label to indicate that these genetic improvement methods have not been used on those products. However, this project has gotten out of control, as nearly 50,000 products now bear the Non-GMO Project label, including kitty litter, salt, and other products that are not even alive. Clearly, table salt is not an “organism,” so labeling it as a potential GMO is false and misleading. If this sounds like a violation of FDA’s consumer protection rules, you are right. Only 10 GMO crops are grown in the U.S. (field and sweet corn, soybeans, alfalfa, cotton, sugar beets, papaya, canola, squash, apples, and potatoes), so putting a Non-GMO label on products made from any other crops is the same as the “cholesterol free” example above. As no GMO varieties of those other crops are grown commercially anywhere, it is misleading to imply that some of them could have been in your food. In addition, once the labeling law is implemented, all foods that do contain GMO ingredients will be labeled and lists of GMO crops will be maintained and updated by the USDA. Thus, there will no longer be any rationale for the misleading “verification” provided by the Non-GMO Project. Instead, consumers will be able to look for the symbol that will signal to them that crop breeders have used safe and tested methods to make our crops more healthy and productive and more resilient to changing pest and weather patterns. It soon will be time for the FDA to enforce its own rules and crack down on the Non-GMO Project and similar labels that profit from playing on unfounded fears to mislead consumers. Kent J. Bradford is a distinguished professor and director of the Seed Biotechnology Center at the University of California, Davis. - - - - - - - - - - [For past Plant Sciences news, go to https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/]"> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "[This op-ed, by Professor Kent Bradford, Director of the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis, is reprinted from The Hill, September 24, 2018] Some companies in California were surprised recently when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates food labeling, announced that it was considering no longer allowing food products to be labeled as “milk” unless they came from lactating animals. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="MsoNormal"><span>[<em>This op-ed, by Professor Kent Bradford, Director of the Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis, is reprinted from <a href="https://thehill.com/opinion/energy-environment/408156-the-pitfalls-of-fdas-gmo-food-labeling">The Hill</a>, September 24, 2018</em>]</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Some companies in California were surprised recently when the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which regulates food labeling, announced that it was considering no longer allowing food products to be labeled as “milk” unless they came from lactating animals. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Almond “milk” has become increasingly popular with consumers and essentially all almonds in the U.S. are grown in California. The state also leads the U.S. in milk production, and dairy interests applauded the FDA move, as they view plant-derived “milk” as piggybacking on the efforts they have made to convince the public of the health benefits of consuming milk, cheese, yogurt and other dairy products.</span></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Kent Bradford" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="435067bc-170d-43e1-8596-609d9e0d8054" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0210.3a%200176.4a%20kent%20bradford%20photo%20-%20Copy.jpg" /><figcaption>Kent Bradford, Distinguished Professor in Plant Sciences, and Director of the Seed Biotechnology Center, UC Davis.</figcaption></figure><p class="MsoNormal"><span>Regardless of these contrasting consequences for key California products, the proposal is consistent with FDA labeling regulations designed to prevent misleading consumers. For example, it is not legal to label plant products as being “cholesterol free,” because plants don’t produce cholesterol. All plant products are cholesterol free, so it is misleading to label some of them that way, as it implies that other plant products not labeled as cholesterol free might contain the compound. At a minimum, advertising a plant product as being cholesterol free implies that some plant products do contain cholesterol, which is false.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>This consumer protection principle will soon be tested across a much wider range of products. Following a law passed by Congress in 2016, the federal Agricultural Marketing Service is devising guidelines for mandatory labeling of food products developed using some specific crop breeding methods. These include improving crops using methods to give them specific characteristics directly, such as the ability to ward off insects without pesticide applications or to require less fertilizer or water, rather than requiring years of development. Even though crops bred using these methods have been grown widely for over 20 years without any harm to consumers, these “Genetically Modified Organism” (GMO) labels or symbols will soon be required on foods in the U.S. in the interest of the consumers’ right to know what is in their foods.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>As labeling of GMO foods was not required previously, the Non-GMO Project has promoted its butterfly label to indicate that these genetic improvement methods have not been used on those products. However, this project has gotten out of control, as nearly 50,000 products now bear the Non-GMO Project label, including kitty litter, salt, and other products that are not even alive. Clearly, table salt is not an “organism,” so labeling it as a potential GMO is false and misleading.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>If this sounds like a violation of FDA’s consumer protection rules, you are right. Only 10 GMO crops are grown in the U.S. (field and sweet corn, soybeans, alfalfa, cotton, sugar beets, papaya, canola, squash, apples, and potatoes), so putting a Non-GMO label on products made from any other crops is the same as the “cholesterol free” example above. As no GMO varieties of those other crops are grown commercially anywhere, it is misleading to imply that some of them could have been in your food.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>In addition, once the labeling law is implemented, all foods that do contain GMO ingredients will be labeled and lists of GMO crops will be maintained and updated by the USDA. Thus, there will no longer be any rationale for the misleading “verification” provided by the Non-GMO Project.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Instead, consumers will be able to look for the symbol that will signal to them that crop breeders have used safe and tested methods to make our crops more healthy and productive and more resilient to changing pest and weather patterns. It soon will be time for the FDA to enforce its own rules and crack down on the Non-GMO Project and similar labels that profit from playing on unfounded fears to mislead consumers.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><em><span><a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/people/kent-bradford">Kent J. Bradford</a> is a distinguished professor and director of the <a href="http://sbc.ucdavis.edu/">Seed Biotechnology Center</a> at the University of California, Davis.</span></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal">- - - - - - - - - -</p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em>For past Plant Sciences news, go to <span><a href="https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/</a></span></em>]</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/gmos" hreflang="en">GMOs</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agriculture" hreflang="en">Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/food-safety" hreflang="en">Food safety</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/gmos" hreflang="en">GMOs</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/policy" hreflang="en">Policy</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 27 Sep 2018 23:33:31 +0000 Ann Filmer 13216 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu Resilient Cropping Systems for a Sustainable Future – Agroecologist Amelie Gaudin https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/resilient-cropping-systems-sustainable-future-agroecologist-amelie-gaudin <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Resilient Cropping Systems for a Sustainable Future – Agroecologist Amelie Gaudin</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 24, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0209.2b%201000%20px%20wide%2C%20for%20SF%20header.jpg?h=8f5db356&amp;itok=h2UqV_eT" width="1280" height="720" alt="Mixed cropping system" title="Resilient cropping systems for a sustainable future" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="Overview: This article, from Scientia, addresses Professor Amelie Gaudin’s research on developing better and diverse agricultural cropping systems. “The ultimate goal of our research is to use agroecological principles to help develop more efficient and resilient cropping systems,” said Gaudin. -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  - Dr Amélie Gaudin at the University of California, Davis explores ways to develop more efficient and resilient cropping systems. Here we take a closer look at just a few of Dr Gaudin’s research projects, which aim to build multifunctional agricultural systems where biodiversity and ecosystem services serve as a basis for improvement. Her comprehensive approach to management offers exciting opportunities to improve resilience and maintain agricultural sustainability in a time of climatic change. Modern farming practices employ improved varieties and intensive practices on specialised farms and landscapes to maximise yields. Agricultural production accelerated dramatically during the ‘Green Revolution’ of the 1970s, and farmers were urged to mechanise and use chemical fertilisers and pesticides to intensify their production. While productivity increased at an astonishing rate, such farming systems are often not sustainable, are vulnerable to climate change, and put the ecosystems they are dependent on at risk. In contrast, an alternative approach places emphasis on ecological intensification, which allows ecosystem services to flourish to decrease dependence on inputs. In this approach, value is placed on a system’s ability to efficiently cycle and use resources, foster healthy soils, and contribute to clean water. The field of agroecology aims to understand the complex ecological processes at play in an agroecosystem and apply this knowledge to the design and management of production systems. In essence, agroecology helps to develop management systems that function more like the ecosystem that agriculture replaced. Dr Amélie Gaudin and her team, in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of California, Davis use agroecological principles to develop management strategies that intensify ecological processes to decrease input needs and decrease the environmental footprint of agriculture. Focusing on whole systems rather than on specific crops, and integrating outreach and education activities, Dr Gaudin brings together a pioneering partnership of growers, agronomists, breeders and industry stakeholders. This comprehensive approach to management offers exciting new opportunities to build both the sustainability and resilience of agroecosystems. Diversification is Key One main research theme explored by Dr Gaudin and her team is the impact of diversification strategies and healthier soils on resilience of agroecosystems to stress. These stressors can be both biotic (relating to or resulting from living organisms, such as insects) or abiotic (physical rather than biological, such as drought). By placing emphasis on soil health, Dr Gaudin’s approach takes into account a soil’s capacity to function as a vital living ecosystem. Indeed, increasing an agroecosystem’s diversity is a key strategy for coping and adapting to climate change. Greater diversity, especially the use of complex crop rotations over time (temporal diversity) is thought to lead to more stable ecosystems, thanks to functional redundancies and improved conservation and access to soil resources by crops. Dr Gaudin and her colleagues set out to test this hypothesis across various extremely valuable agroecosystems, from temperate rainfed maize of the Midwest to irrigated semi-arid tomato production systems of California. Their aim is also to better understand the underlying mechanisms to inform management and enhance sustainable food production under abiotic stresses. The research team first undertook retrospective analysis of historical data from a 31-year long-term rotation and tillage trial to explore the impact of temporal diversity (rotation) and reduced disturbance (tillage) on resilience of maize and soybean systems in the northern Corn Belt, Ontario, Canada. This region was once prairie, but over the past 30 years has experienced large decreases in agroecosystem diversity – small grain cereals have been progressively replaced by rows of soybeans and corn, which now dominate the landscape. Dr Gaudin’s study is the first to quantify the impact of management practices on yield stability, particularly when exposed to extreme weather events (drought or flooding). Dr Gaudin and her team validated the hypothesis that crop yield stability significantly increases when corn and soybean are integrated into more diverse rotations. They found that introducing small grains into short corn-soybean rotation provided significant benefits on long-term soybean yields. Crop diversification increased the likelihood of harnessing favourable growing conditions, and decreased the risk of crop failure. In hot and dry years, diversification of corn-soybean rotations and reduced tillage increased yields by 7% (for corn) and 22% (for soybean). Exploring the underlying mechanisms, Dr Gaudin gives compelling evidence that complex rotations and reduced disturbance have a synergistic effect – where the collective effect provides greater benefit than separate effects combined. In a similar study on irrigated tomato crops, Dr Gaudin and her colleagues are now exploring the ways in which more diversified systems show significant yield resilience over time and when lower levels of irrigation are applied. Such an approach takes advantage of better soil health to conserve costly and finite water supplies. The team’s recent findings show that rotation complexity provides a systems approach to help adapt agroecosystems to changes in crop growing conditions. This approach could help to sustain future yields under increasingly difficult production environments, by making farming systems more resilient to environmental stress.   Amazing Grazing Another strategy to increase diversification explored by Dr Gaudin and her team is the impact of reintegrating livestock into cropland. Dr Gaudin investigates how land-based livestock integration and manure amendments impact resilience and sustainability of dairy forage and viticulture cropping systems – both huge industries in California. Traditional agricultural systems commonly combined livestock production with crop rotations. However, modern industrial agriculture methods that incentivise specialisation and economies of scale have moved towards decoupling crop and livestock production, resulting in concerns over water quality, agriculture’s high carbon footprint and poor soil health. Could re-integrating crop and livestock systems at the field and farm level help reduce inputs while increasing yields? What are the main barriers to adoption? This question is posed by Dr Gaudin in a recent publication, highlighting many knowledge gaps associated with both social and ecological aspects of integrated crop and livestock systems. She and others advocate for transdisciplinary and collaborative research efforts to address these gaps and inform effective reintegration. California, which has extremely diverse cropping systems, provides promising opportunities for this reintegration. Dr Gaudin’s own research investigates the impacts of sheep grazing on soil health and the sustainability of annuals and vineyard production systems in California. Dr Gaudin and her research partners also seek to understand changes in the long-term stability and resilience of primary production of soybean with greater cattle livestock integration in Brazil.   Using Soil Science to Control Pests The Gaudin lab also explores strategies that build resilience to pests. The team recently discovered that soil and rhizosphere microbes are instrumental to building up plant defences against herbivores, especially insects, which can carry major viruses. For instance, tomato crops in California are vulnerable to the beet leafhopper, which carries a damaging virus that negatively impacts crop yields. Dr Gaudin and her collaborators aim to understand the potential of organic soil management practices to decrease infestation of leafhoppers. Intriguingly, the microbes at the plant root surface (the rhizosphere) play an instrumental role in this process. Their research has revealed that soil-health building management practices, such as compost and cover crops, affect tomato attractiveness to beet leafhoppers and can therefore potentially reduce virus incidence. Understanding these mechanisms better, especially in the rhizosphere, can help us use this knowledge to breed for below-ground characteristics that improve soil health and plant resilience to multiple stresses.   A Healthy Soil for Healthy Yields Roots and rhizosphere processes are vital for plant fitness and productivity and are key for helping to harness improvements in soil health. Plants have been bred for their high yield above-ground characteristics, but Dr Gaudin argues that this may have been at the expense of benefits to the root systems and the plants’ ability to team up with soil microbes. Characteristics such as efficient foraging and uptake, which are beneficial in lower input environments, may have been lost. Understanding how human selection has affected root traits and rhizosphere interactions can help inform breeding and management practices that promote natural resource acquisition. In 2016, Dr Gaudin was awarded a New Innovator in Food and Agricultural Research to address critical gaps in understanding how to optimise root systems that can better exploit improvements in soil health. By analysing a wealth of data from maize crops bred over 10,000 years, Dr Gaudin’s team is looking at how breeding has affected root characteristics, their associated microbes and their functional significance for resource cycling and acquisition when suboptimal. ‘By testing how breeding has impacted corn and tomato root and rhizosphere processes critical to cycle and uptake resources, we hope to shed light on how breeders and producers can grow more productive and resilient crops and promote adoption of more sustainable practices at a large scale,’ says Dr Gaudin. Through their research and outreach activities, Dr Gaudin and her team are forging the way ahead for understanding ecological processes and applying these concepts to the management of farming systems. This comprehensive approach that builds sustainability promises to help develop more efficient and resilient cropping systems for the future. -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  - Meet the Researcher Amelie Gaudin, UC DavisDr Amélie Gaudin completed her PhD in plant agriculture at the University of Guelph in 2011. Upon graduating, she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the International Rice Research Institute and then the University of Guelph, before joining the faculty at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) in 2015. She is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of Plant Sciences, where her team specialises in agroecology. Her research seeks to develop management strategies that emphasise soil health and biodiversity as a basis for improvement. Outreach activities and close collaboration with stakeholders ensures that her research is relevant to the sustainability of California’s agriculture. http://gaudin.ucdavis.edu   Further Reading JE Schmidt, C Peterson, D Wang, K Scow, ACM Gaudin, Agroecosystem tradeoffs associated with conversion to subsurface drip irrigation in organic systems, Agricultural Water Management, 2018, 202, 1–8. CA Peterson, VT Eviner, ACM Gaudin, Ways forward for resilience research in agroecosystems, Agricultural Systems, 2018, 162, 19–27. JE Schmidt, ACM Gaudin, Toward an Integrated Root Ideotype for Irrigated Systems, Trends in Plant Science, 2017, 22, 433–443. JE Schmidt, TM Bowles, ACM Gaudin, Using Ancient Traits to Convert Soil Health into Crop Yield: Impact of Selection on Maize Root and Rhizosphere Function, Frontiers in Plant Science, 2016, 7, 373. ACM Gaudin, T Tolhurst, A Ker, RC Martin, W Deen, Increasing crop diversity mitigates weather variations and improves yield stability, PLoS ONE, 2015, 10, e0113261. - - - - - - - - - - [For past Plant Sciences news, go to https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/]"> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Overview: This article, from Scientia, addresses Professor Amelie Gaudin’s research on developing better and diverse agricultural cropping systems. “The ultimate goal of our research is to use agroecological principles to help develop more efficient and resilient cropping systems,” said Gaudin." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Overview:</strong> This <a href="https://www.scientia.global/dr-amelie-gaudin-resilient-cropping-systems-for-a-sustainable-future/">article</a>, from <a href="https://www.scientia.global/">Scientia</a>, addresses Professor Amelie Gaudin’s research on developing better and diverse agricultural cropping systems. “The ultimate goal of our research is to use agroecological principles to help develop more efficient and resilient cropping systems,” said Gaudin.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Dr Amélie Gaudin at the University of California, Davis explores ways to develop more efficient and resilient cropping systems. Here we take a closer look at just a few of Dr Gaudin’s research projects, which aim to build multifunctional agricultural systems where biodiversity and ecosystem services serve as a basis for improvement. Her comprehensive approach to management offers exciting opportunities to improve resilience and maintain agricultural sustainability in a time of climatic change.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Modern farming practices employ improved varieties and intensive practices on specialised farms and landscapes to maximise yields. Agricultural production accelerated dramatically during the ‘Green Revolution’ of the 1970s, and farmers were urged to mechanise and use chemical fertilisers and pesticides to intensify their production. While productivity increased at an astonishing rate, such farming systems are often not sustainable, are vulnerable to climate change, and put the ecosystems they are dependent on at risk.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">In contrast, an alternative approach places emphasis on ecological intensification, which allows ecosystem services to flourish to decrease dependence on inputs. In this approach, value is placed on a system’s ability to efficiently cycle and use resources, foster healthy soils, and contribute to clean water. The field of agroecology aims to understand the complex ecological processes at play in an agroecosystem and apply this knowledge to the design and management of production systems. In essence, agroecology helps to develop management systems that function more like the ecosystem that agriculture replaced.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Dr Amélie Gaudin and her team, in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of California, Davis use agroecological principles to develop management strategies that intensify ecological processes to decrease input needs and decrease the environmental footprint of agriculture.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Focusing on whole systems rather than on specific crops, and integrating outreach and education activities, Dr Gaudin brings together a pioneering partnership of growers, agronomists, breeders and industry stakeholders. This comprehensive approach to management offers exciting new opportunities to build both the sustainability and resilience of agroecosystems.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Diversification is Key<img alt="Researchers digging in soil" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="2369da04-164b-4c96-a58a-4be33481f87f" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0209.3b%20425%20px%20wide%2C%20for%20SF.jpg" class="align-right" /></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">One main research theme explored by Dr Gaudin and her team is the impact of diversification strategies and healthier soils on resilience of agroecosystems to stress. These stressors can be both biotic (relating to or resulting from living organisms, such as insects) or abiotic (physical rather than biological, such as drought). By placing emphasis on soil health, Dr Gaudin’s approach takes into account a soil’s capacity to function as a vital living ecosystem.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Indeed, increasing an agroecosystem’s diversity is a key strategy for coping and adapting to climate change. Greater diversity, especially the use of complex crop rotations over time (temporal diversity) is thought to lead to more stable ecosystems, thanks to functional redundancies and improved conservation and access to soil resources by crops. Dr Gaudin and her colleagues set out to test this hypothesis across various extremely valuable agroecosystems, from temperate rainfed maize of the Midwest to irrigated semi-arid tomato production systems of California. Their aim is also to better understand the underlying mechanisms to inform management and enhance sustainable food production under abiotic stresses.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">The research team first undertook retrospective analysis of historical data from a 31-year long-term rotation and tillage trial to explore the impact of temporal diversity (rotation) and reduced disturbance (tillage) on resilience of maize and soybean systems in the northern Corn Belt, Ontario, Canada. This region was once prairie, but over the past 30 years has experienced large decreases in agroecosystem diversity – small grain cereals have been progressively replaced by rows of soybeans and corn, which now dominate the landscape. Dr Gaudin’s study is the first to quantify the impact of management practices on yield stability, particularly when exposed to extreme weather events (drought or flooding).</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Dr Gaudin and her team validated the hypothesis that crop yield stability significantly increases when corn and soybean are integrated into more diverse rotations. They found that introducing small grains into short corn-soybean rotation provided significant benefits on long-term soybean yields. Crop diversification increased the likelihood of harnessing favourable growing conditions, and decreased the risk of crop failure. In hot and dry years, diversification of corn-soybean rotations and reduced tillage increased yields by 7% (for corn) and 22% (for soybean).</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Exploring the underlying mechanisms, Dr Gaudin gives compelling evidence that complex rotations and reduced disturbance have a synergistic effect – where the collective effect provides greater benefit than separate effects combined. In a similar study on irrigated tomato crops, Dr Gaudin and her colleagues are now exploring the ways in which more diversified systems show significant yield resilience over time and when lower levels of irrigation are applied. Such an approach takes advantage of better soil health to conserve costly and finite water supplies.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">The team’s recent findings show that rotation complexity provides a systems approach to help adapt agroecosystems to changes in crop growing conditions. This approach could help to sustain future yields under increasingly difficult production environments, by making farming systems more resilient to environmental stress.</p> <img alt="Mixed crops on a farm" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="82fcd8b8-6cab-410d-9627-078b533b3d5c" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0209.4b%20for%20SF%2C%20center%20photo.jpg" class="align-center" /><p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Amazing Grazing</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Another strategy to increase diversification explored by Dr Gaudin and her team is the impact of reintegrating livestock into cropland. Dr Gaudin investigates how land-based livestock integration and manure amendments impact resilience and sustainability of dairy forage and viticulture cropping systems – both huge industries in California.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Traditional agricultural systems commonly combined livestock production with crop rotations. However, modern industrial agriculture methods that incentivise specialisation and economies of scale have moved towards decoupling crop and livestock production, resulting in concerns over water quality, agriculture’s high carbon footprint and poor soil health.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Could re-integrating crop and livestock systems at the field and farm level help reduce inputs while increasing yields? What are the main barriers to adoption? This question is posed by Dr</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Gaudin in a recent publication, highlighting many knowledge gaps associated with both social and ecological aspects of integrated crop and livestock systems. She and others advocate for transdisciplinary and collaborative research efforts to address these gaps and inform effective reintegration.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">California, which has extremely diverse cropping systems, provides promising opportunities for this reintegration. Dr Gaudin’s own research investigates the impacts of sheep grazing on soil health and the sustainability of annuals and vineyard production systems in California. Dr Gaudin and her research partners also seek to understand changes in the long-term stability and resilience of primary production of soybean with greater cattle livestock integration in Brazil.</p> <img alt="Root system on a plant" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="b38273ef-5972-4443-8bae-b6956c4ce20d" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0209.5a%20rhizosphere--768x576.jpg" class="align-center" /><p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Using Soil Science to Control Pests </strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">The Gaudin lab also explores strategies that build resilience to pests. The team recently discovered that soil and rhizosphere microbes are instrumental to building up plant defences against herbivores, especially insects, which can carry major viruses. For instance, tomato crops in California are vulnerable to the beet leafhopper, which carries a damaging virus that negatively impacts crop yields. Dr Gaudin and her collaborators aim to understand the potential of organic soil management practices to decrease infestation of leafhoppers. Intriguingly, the microbes at the plant root surface (the rhizosphere) play an instrumental role in this process.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Their research has revealed that soil-health building management practices, such as compost and cover crops, affect tomato attractiveness to beet leafhoppers and can therefore potentially reduce virus incidence. Understanding these mechanisms better, especially in the rhizosphere, can help us use this knowledge to breed for below-ground characteristics that improve soil health and plant resilience to multiple stresses.</p> <img alt="Viewing soil in the field" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="6497ed5d-0f80-4578-9d11-252685291da9" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0209.6a%20tomato-roots-768x576.jpg" class="align-center" /><p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>A Healthy Soil for Healthy Yields</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Roots and rhizosphere processes are vital for plant fitness and productivity and are key for helping to harness improvements in soil health. Plants have been bred for their high yield above-ground characteristics, but Dr Gaudin argues that this may have been at the expense of benefits to the root systems and the plants’ ability to team up with soil microbes. Characteristics such as efficient foraging and uptake, which are beneficial in lower input environments, may have been lost.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Understanding how human selection has affected root traits and rhizosphere interactions can help inform breeding and management practices that promote natural resource acquisition. In 2016, Dr Gaudin was awarded a New Innovator in Food and Agricultural Research to address critical gaps in understanding how to optimise root systems that can better exploit improvements in soil health.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">By analysing a wealth of data from maize crops bred over 10,000 years, Dr Gaudin’s team is looking at how breeding has affected root characteristics, their associated microbes and their functional significance for resource cycling and acquisition when suboptimal.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">‘By testing how breeding has impacted corn and tomato root and rhizosphere processes critical to cycle and uptake resources, we hope to shed light on how breeders and producers can grow more productive and resilient crops and promote adoption of more sustainable practices at a large scale,’ says Dr Gaudin.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Through their research and outreach activities, Dr Gaudin and her team are forging the way ahead for understanding ecological processes and applying these concepts to the management of farming systems. This comprehensive approach that builds sustainability promises to help develop more efficient and resilient cropping systems for the future.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-<span>  </span>-</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Meet the Researcher</strong></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Amelie Gaudin, UC Davis" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4e53dd54-79d2-4884-bcea-d6673529747a" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0209.7b%20250%20px%20wide%2C%20for%20SF.jpg" /><figcaption>Amelie Gaudin, UC Davis</figcaption></figure><p class="MsoNormal">Dr <a href="mailto:agaudin@ucdavis.edu">Amélie Gaudin</a> completed her PhD in plant agriculture at the University of Guelph in 2011. Upon graduating, she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the International Rice Research Institute and then the University of Guelph, before joining the faculty at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) in 2015. She is currently Assistant Professor in the <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">Department of Plant Sciences</a>, where her team specialises in agroecology. Her research seeks to develop management strategies that emphasise soil health and biodiversity as a basis for improvement. Outreach activities and close collaboration with stakeholders ensures that her research is relevant to the sustainability of California’s agriculture.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://gaudin.ucdavis.edu">http://gaudin.ucdavis.edu</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Further Reading</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal">JE Schmidt, C Peterson, D Wang, K Scow, ACM Gaudin, Agroecosystem tradeoffs associated with conversion to subsurface drip irrigation in organic systems, Agricultural Water Management, 2018, 202, 1–8.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">CA Peterson, VT Eviner, ACM Gaudin, Ways forward for resilience research in agroecosystems, Agricultural Systems, 2018, 162, 19–27.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">JE Schmidt, ACM Gaudin, Toward an Integrated Root Ideotype for Irrigated Systems, Trends in Plant Science, 2017, 22, 433–443.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">JE Schmidt, TM Bowles, ACM Gaudin, Using Ancient Traits to Convert Soil Health into Crop Yield: Impact of Selection on Maize Root and Rhizosphere Function, Frontiers in Plant Science, 2016, 7, 373.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">ACM Gaudin, T Tolhurst, A Ker, RC Martin, W Deen, Increasing crop diversity mitigates weather variations and improves yield stability, PLoS ONE, 2015, 10, e0113261.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">- - - - - - - - - -</p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em>For past Plant Sciences news, go to <a href="https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/</a></em>]</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/agroecology" hreflang="en">Agroecology</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agriculture" hreflang="en">Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agroecology" hreflang="en">Agroecology</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/biodiversity" hreflang="en">Biodiversity</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/ecology" hreflang="en">Ecology</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/ecosystems" hreflang="en">Ecosystems</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/environmental-impacts" hreflang="en">Environmental impacts</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/environmetal-resources" hreflang="en">Environmetal resources</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/natural-resources" hreflang="en">Natural resources</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/roots" hreflang="en">Roots</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/soil-and-soil-science" hreflang="en">Soil and soil science</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/stress" hreflang="en">Stress</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/sustainability" hreflang="en">Sustainability</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 24 Sep 2018 22:05:02 +0000 Ann Filmer 13191 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu Every Plant Has a Story: Ellen Dean and the Center for Plant Diversity https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/every-plant-has-story-ellen-dean-and-center-plant-diversity <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Every Plant Has a Story: Ellen Dean and the Center for Plant Diversity </span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 20, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0208.2d%20for%20SiteFarm%20header%20photo.jpg?h=b40fa25b&amp;itok=O29bhD7U" width="1280" height="720" alt="Ellen Dean, UC Davis" title="Researchers, farmers and others across California seek Ellen Dean&#039;s plant identification expertise and access to the center’s many hidden treasures, which tell tales from times long past. (David Slipher/UC Davis)" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="Inside the Sciences Lab Building, tucked next to the Biological Academic Success Center, is a door with a placard reading, “UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity” (aka Herbarium). Step inside and you’ll find undergraduates working at tables, curating and prepping dried plants for display and storage. Around 350,000 dried specimens are stored in the center, organized in phylogenetic order. There are algae, lichens, ferns, angiosperms and much more. And overseeing this massive resource is curator Ellen Dean. For more than 20 years, Dean has made the Center for Plant Diversity a passion project. Researchers, farmers and others across California seek her plant identification expertise and access to the center’s many hidden treasures, which tell tales from times long past. Slowing down to appreciate the pace of plants Dean’s path to the UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity started in her hometown of Berkeley, California. As a child, she used plants as playthings and ingredients in make-believe concoctions. “Most people aren’t drawn to plants as a child in our culture,” said Dean, noting the prevalence of stories and books based around animal characters. “In many parts of the world, people’s grandmothers teach them about plants. They have that sense of place and know the plants around them and use them for medicine and food.” Dean’s mother — a Montessori teacher — taught her to appreciate the seemingly still elegance of plants, emphasizing that they really come to life when one slows down to appreciate them. While Dean’s appreciation for plants ran deep, she initially thought her academic interests lay in animal biology and behavior. But a biology course at her alma mater, Stony Brook University, shifted her mindset. “There was this lab where you had to dissect a frog and ablate a nerve and still watch all its functions, and I just couldn’t do it,” said Dean. “I became a botanist at that moment.” After graduating, Dean landed a lab position in Columbia University’s Department of Biological Sciences. There, she studied nematode neurobiology but continued nurturing her interest in plants. She audited courses, taught herself plant biology and eventually secured a position in the New York Botanical Garden’s herbarium, where she stayed for about a year and a half. Other jobs followed, including a stint as a forest botanist, but Dean soon decided to head back to the West Coast for graduate school. In 1995, she graduated from UC Berkeley with a Ph.D. in Integrative Biology. She joined the staff of UC Davis shortly after.  The who, what, where and why of plant collection Sarina Rodriguez glues a sample to card paper to prepare it for the plant archives. (David Slipher/UC Davis)In the Center for Plant Diversity, every specimen tells a story. Besides using the facility for plant identification and taxonomy, people, according to Dean, come here for the stories. Each curated specimen has a label filled with as much information as possible about its collection. Where was it collected? Who collected it? And when? “That’s something I’m extremely taken with,” said Dean. “With herbarium specimens, you get to know the collectors and each label adds a little story about their life.” “I sort of feel like it’s a gift that I’ve been given to keep track of all this,” she added. The specimens are windows into history, providing researchers with clues about past climates. But they also tell tales of scientists past. Like that of botanist Katherine Esau, a pioneer of plant anatomy. Esau spent nearly 35 years at UC Davis, starting at the university with a graduate assistantship. After receiving a doctorate, she joined the faculty in 1931. During her lifetime, she received many accolades for her research on diseased plants and overall contributions to the botany field, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, election to the National Academy of Sciences and the National Medal of Science. She also wrote the monumental textbooks Plant Anatomy and The Anatomy of Seed Plants.      “She became one of the most famous anatomists of all time,” said Dean. “I mean she’s one of those people that really helped make Davis great.” Esau was instrumental in the herbarium’s formation and expansion, assisting W.W. Robbins, the founder of the university’s botany department. Esau expanded Robbins’ small collection, adding native plants from the Sacramento Valley and nearby Coast Ranges. Her career eventually took her to UC Santa Barbara in the 1960s. “Most of her research materials left the campus, but we have her herbarium,” Dean said. “I like seeing her name on her specimens.” &quot;Even though I’m an NPB major, it helps to have some basic knowledge of plants in my back pocket. Especially when we were learning about plant medicines and herbal remedies for health.&quot; - Sarina Rodriguez, Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, and Chicana/Chicano Studies   Hannah Kang takes measurements of plant samples. (David Slipher/UC Davis)Student involvement UC Davis students have opportunities to get involved at the Center for Plant Diversity. According to Dean, the facility employs between 10 and 12 undergraduate students each year. Student employees learn many skills, including how to use plant presses, create labels and mount dried specimens for display. “By working at the herbarium, you really get a feeling for the plant families and genera,” said Dean. According to her, in the last twenty years, the facility has focused on curating many untouched specimens collected during the past century. “The other really fun thing about herbaria is the stories the newspapers tell,” said Dean. When pressing plants, taxonomists usually use newspapers to contain the plant material. The plant press is then placed in a heated, cupboard-like area, where it sits for several days to dry. “Not only are the specimens windows, but the newspapers are windows into the time period when the plant was collected or stored,” she said. “The Center for Plant Diversity preserves so much that is important about UC Davis.”  &quot;We all share the same passion. The environment is very educational and people here are very kind. Phenology, evolution and taxonomy – Ellen really hones it in and helps you learn more about fields like that.&quot; - Hannah Kang, Plant Biology     Contact: Ellen Dean, Curator, Center for Plant Diversity, Dept. of Plant Sciences, UC Davis ( Original article by Greg Watry, UC Davis.) - - - - - - - - - - [For past Plant Sciences news, go to https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/] When pressing plants, taxonomists usually use newspapers to contain the plant material. (David Slipher/UC Davis) "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Inside the Sciences Lab Building, tucked next to the Biological Academic Success Center, is a door with a placard reading, “UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity” (aka Herbarium). Step inside and you’ll find undergraduates working at tables, curating and prepping dried plants for display and storage. Around 350,000 dried specimens are stored in the center, organized in phylogenetic order. There are algae, lichens, ferns, angiosperms and much more. And overseeing this massive resource is curator Ellen Dean. " } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="MsoNormal"><span>Inside the Sciences Lab Building, tucked next to the Biological Academic Success Center, is a door with a placard reading, “UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity” (aka Herbarium). Step inside and you’ll find undergraduates working at tables, curating and prepping dried plants for display and storage. Around 350,000 dried specimens are stored in the center, organized in phylogenetic order. There are algae, lichens, ferns, angiosperms and much more.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>And overseeing this massive resource is curator Ellen Dean. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>For more than 20 years, Dean has made the <span><a href="https://herbarium.ucdavis.edu/"><span>Center for Plant Diversity</span></a></span> a passion project. Researchers, farmers and others across California seek her plant identification expertise and access to the center’s many <span><a href="https://herbarium.ucdavis.edu/pdfs/articles/Hidden%20Treasures.pdf"><span>hidden treasures</span></a></span>, which tell tales from times long past. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><span>Slowing down to appreciate the pace of plants</span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Dean’s path to the UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity started in her hometown of Berkeley, California. As a child, she used plants as playthings and ingredients in make-believe concoctions. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“Most people aren’t drawn to plants as a child in our culture,” said Dean, noting the prevalence of stories and books based around animal characters. “In many parts of the world, people’s grandmothers teach them about plants. They have that sense of place and know the plants around them and use them for medicine and food.” </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Dean’s mother — a Montessori teacher — taught her to appreciate the seemingly still elegance of plants, emphasizing that they really come to life when one slows down to appreciate them. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>While Dean’s appreciation for plants ran deep, she initially thought her academic interests lay in animal biology and behavior. But a biology course at her alma mater, Stony Brook University, shifted her mindset.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“There was this lab where you had to dissect a frog and ablate a nerve and still watch all its functions, and I just couldn’t do it,” said Dean. “I became a botanist at that moment.” </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>After graduating, Dean landed a lab position in Columbia University’s Department of Biological Sciences. There, she studied nematode neurobiology but continued nurturing her interest in plants. She audited courses, taught herself plant biology and eventually secured a position in the New York Botanical Garden’s herbarium, where she stayed for about a year and a half. Other jobs followed, including a stint as a forest botanist, but Dean soon decided to head back to the West Coast for graduate school. In 1995, she graduated from UC Berkeley with a Ph.D. in Integrative Biology. She joined the staff of UC Davis shortly after.  </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong><span>The who, what, where and why of plant collection</span></strong></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Sarina Rodriguez, UC Davis" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="4f469dbb-bd62-4680-a1d7-0b44dbd0ab08" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0208.3b%20500%20px%20wide%2C%20for%20SF%20post.jpg" /><figcaption>Sarina Rodriguez glues a sample to card paper to prepare it for the plant archives. (David Slipher/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p class="MsoNormal"><span>In the Center for Plant Diversity, every specimen tells a story. Besides using the facility for plant identification and taxonomy, people, according to Dean, come here for the stories. Each curated specimen has a label filled with as much information as possible about its collection. Where was it collected? Who collected it? And when? </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“That’s something I’m extremely taken with,” said Dean. “With herbarium specimens, you get to know the collectors and each label adds a little story about their life.”</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“I sort of feel like it’s a gift that I’ve been given to keep track of all this,” she added. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>The specimens are windows into history, providing researchers with clues about past climates. But they also tell tales of scientists past. Like that of botanist Katherine Esau, a <span><a href="http://www-plb.ucdavis.edu/esau/about.htm"><span>pioneer of plant anatomy</span></a></span>.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Esau spent nearly 35 years at UC Davis, starting at the university with a graduate assistantship. After receiving a doctorate, she joined the faculty in 1931. During her lifetime, she received many accolades for her research on diseased plants and overall contributions to the botany field, including a Guggenheim Fellowship, election to the National Academy of Sciences and the National Medal of Science. She also wrote the monumental textbooks <em>Plant Anatomy</em> and <em>The Anatomy of Seed Plants</em>.      </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“She became one of the most famous anatomists of all time,” said Dean. “I mean she’s one of those people that really helped make Davis great.” </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>Esau was instrumental in the herbarium’s formation and expansion, assisting W.W. Robbins, the founder of the university’s botany department. Esau expanded Robbins’ small collection, adding native plants from the Sacramento Valley and nearby Coast Ranges. Her career eventually took her to UC Santa Barbara in the 1960s. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“Most of her research materials left the campus, but we have her herbarium,” Dean said. “I like seeing her name on her specimens.” </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal indent--large"><em><span>"Even though I’m an NPB major, it helps to have some basic knowledge of plants in my back pocket. Especially when we were learning about plant medicines and herbal remedies for health."<br /> - Sarina Rodriguez, Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, and Chicana/Chicano Studies</span></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal indent--large"> </p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-left"><img alt="Hanna Kang, UC Davis" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="bb84d536-f71d-4900-851e-710cee1a95a8" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0208.4b%20500%20px%20wide%20for%20SF%20post.jpg" /><figcaption>Hannah Kang takes measurements of plant samples. (David Slipher/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p class="MsoNormal"><strong><span>Student involvement</span></strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>UC Davis students have opportunities to get involved at the Center for Plant Diversity. According to Dean, the facility employs between 10 and 12 undergraduate students each year. Student employees learn many skills, including how to use plant presses, create labels and mount dried specimens for display. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“By working at the herbarium, you really get a feeling for the plant families and genera,” said Dean. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>According to her, in the last twenty years, the facility has focused on curating many untouched specimens collected during the past century.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“The other really fun thing about herbaria is the stories the newspapers tell,” said Dean.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>When pressing plants, taxonomists usually use newspapers to contain the plant material. The plant press is then placed in a heated, cupboard-like area, where it sits for several days to dry. </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span>“Not only are the specimens windows, but the newspapers are windows into the time period when the plant was collected or stored,” she said. “The Center for Plant Diversity preserves so much that is important about UC Davis.”  </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal indent--large"><em><span>"We all share the same passion. The environment is very educational and people here are very kind. Phenology, evolution and taxonomy – Ellen really hones it in and helps you learn more about fields like that."<br /> - Hannah Kang, Plant Biology</span></em></p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Contact:</strong></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/people/ellen-dean">Ellen Dean</a>, Curator, Center for Plant Diversity, <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">Dept. of Plant Sciences</a>, UC Davis</p> <p class="MsoNormal">( <em><a href="https://biology.ucdavis.edu/news/every-plant-has-story-ellen-dean-and-center-plant-diversity">Original article</a> by <a href="mailto:gdwatry@ucdavis.edu">Greg Watry</a>, UC Davis.</em>)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">- - - - - - - - - -</p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em>For past Plant Sciences news, go to <a href="https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/</a></em>]</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Ellen Dean, pressing plants" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="df8f8483-e05b-4d88-902a-757ed303457f" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0208.5c%201000%20px%20wide.jpg" /><figcaption>When pressing plants, taxonomists usually use newspapers to contain the plant material. (David Slipher/UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p> </p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/students-and-education" hreflang="en">Students and education</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agriculture" hreflang="en">Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/biodiversity" hreflang="en">Biodiversity</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/outreach" hreflang="en">Outreach</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/plant-communities" hreflang="en">Plant communities</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/plant-science" hreflang="en">Plant science</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students-and-education" hreflang="en">Students and education</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/wildflowers" hreflang="en">Wildflowers</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 20 Sep 2018 18:38:54 +0000 Ann Filmer 13186 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu Cannabis sativa: The Plant and its Impact on People – New Graduate Course at UC Davis https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/cannabis-sativa-plant-and-its-impact-people-new-graduate-course-uc-davis <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Cannabis sativa: The Plant and its Impact on People – New Graduate Course at UC Davis</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 17, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0207.2e%20for%20SiteFarm%20header.jpg?h=e3dd40f0&amp;itok=2jEMMxWE" width="1280" height="720" alt="Cannabis drawing" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="A new graduate course – Cannabis sativa: The Plant and its Impact on People – will be offered in Plant Sciences at UC Davis, starting fall quarter 2018. This seminar style course will provide a scientific overview of the biology, genetics, biochemistry and pharmacological potential of Cannabis sativa. Cannabis is among the world’s earliest domesticated plant species and this class will explore its origin, evolution and ethnobiology. Students will learn how specialized metabolites synthesized by Cannabis interact with receptors in the mammalian endocannabinoid neurotransmitter system and how these interactions affect pain sensation, mood, memory and other central nervous functions. The course will cover the status of clinical trials using synthetic and plant derived cannabinoids to treat neurological disorders. In addition, students will learn how cannabis is currently cultivated and the rapidly changing legal landscape associated with its production and utilization. Cannabis sativa illustration. (from Wikimedia commons)A graduate from this course will be able to: Understand the biology of the Cannabis plant including its anatomy, growth requirements, reproductive cycle, evolution, genetics and specialized metabolism Identify the biochemical pathways and processes leading to bioactive secondary metabolites in Cannabis Understand the basic biology of the endocannabinoid neuro-receptor system in humans Compare the effectiveness of medical Cannabis to traditional pharmacologicals Appraise the impact of Cannabis in modern society Rationally explore career opportunities in an exploding agricultural sector The course (PLS 290, CRN# 37559, 2 units), led by Professor John Yoder, consists of weekly lectures and discussions. Lectures will be presented by invited speakers selected for their expertise in their topic area. The first lecture is October 2, 2018. The lectures will be recorded and streamed online. Students who wish to take this course for credit will also participate in a journal club discussion section after the seminar. (Article by Ann Filmer and John Yoder, UC Davis Dept. of Plant Sciences.) - - - - - - - - - - [For past Plant Sciences news, go to https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/]"> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "A new graduate course – Cannabis sativa: The Plant and its Impact on People – will be offered in Plant Sciences at UC Davis, starting fall quarter 2018. This seminar style course will provide a scientific overview of the biology, genetics, biochemistry and pharmacological potential of Cannabis sativa. Cannabis is among the world’s earliest domesticated plant species and this class will explore its origin, evolution and ethnobiology." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>A new graduate course – <em>Cannabis sativa</em>: The Plant and its Impact on People – will be offered in Plant Sciences at UC Davis, starting fall quarter 2018.</p> <p>This seminar style course will provide a scientific overview of the biology, genetics, biochemistry and pharmacological potential of <em>Cannabis sativa</em>. Cannabis is among the world’s earliest domesticated plant species and this class will explore its origin, evolution and ethnobiology.</p> <p>Students will learn how specialized metabolites synthesized by Cannabis interact with receptors in the mammalian endocannabinoid neurotransmitter system and how these interactions affect pain sensation, mood, memory and other central nervous functions. The course will cover the status of clinical trials using synthetic and plant derived cannabinoids to treat neurological disorders. In addition, students will learn how cannabis is currently cultivated and the rapidly changing legal landscape associated with its production and utilization.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Cannabis drawing" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="54c34321-cc12-4fde-aed4-ad981a4834a7" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0207.2f%20600%20px%20for%20SiteFarm%20content.jpg" /><figcaption>Cannabis sativa illustration. (from Wikimedia commons)</figcaption></figure><p>A graduate from this course will be able to:</p> <ul><li>Understand the biology of the Cannabis plant including its anatomy, growth requirements, reproductive cycle, evolution, genetics and specialized metabolism</li> <li>Identify the biochemical pathways and processes leading to bioactive secondary metabolites in Cannabis</li> <li>Understand the basic biology of the endocannabinoid neuro-receptor system in humans</li> <li>Compare the effectiveness of medical Cannabis to traditional pharmacologicals</li> <li>Appraise the impact of Cannabis in modern society</li> <li>Rationally explore career opportunities in an exploding agricultural sector</li> </ul><p>The course (PLS 290, CRN# 37559, 2 units), led by Professor <a href="mailto:jiyoder@ucdavis.edu">John Yoder</a>, consists of weekly lectures and discussions. Lectures will be presented by invited speakers selected for their expertise in their topic area. The first lecture is October 2, 2018.</p> <p>The lectures will be recorded and streamed online. Students who wish to take this course for credit will also participate in a journal club discussion section after the seminar.</p> <p>(<em>Article by <a href="mailto:afilmer@ucdavis.edu">Ann Filmer</a> and <a href="mailto:jiyoder@ucdavis.edu">John Yoder</a>, UC Davis <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/plantsciences/">Dept. of Plant Sciences</a>.</em>)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">- - - - - - - - - -</p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em>For past Plant Sciences news, go to <a href="https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/</a></em>]</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/students-and-education" hreflang="en">Students and education</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agriculture" hreflang="en">Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/department-news" hreflang="en">Department news</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/health" hreflang="en">Health</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students-and-education" hreflang="en">Students and education</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/uc-davis-news" hreflang="en">UC Davis news</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 17 Sep 2018 23:15:14 +0000 Ann Filmer 13181 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu UC Davis Plant Breeding Academy Starts the Seventh Class https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-plant-breeding-academy-starts-seventh-class <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UC Davis Plant Breeding Academy Starts the Seventh Class</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 14, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0206.2c%201100%20px%20wide.jpg?h=e14887af&amp;itok=31I8ZJzF" width="1280" height="720" alt="Plant Breeding Academy class members, UC Davis" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="Contributing to fill a critical need for trained plant breeders, the University of California, Davis, Plant Breeding AcademySM (PBA) started its seventh class of students this week with a session in Davis, California. Over the next two years this class will spend more than 300 hours in classes, workshops and the field, training to complete this premium professional certification program. The Plant Breeding Academy is a premium professional development program designed to develop and enhance the skills of industry personnel around the world to enable them to become independent plant breeders or to contribute to larger breeding programs. The two-year course addresses the reduced numbers of plant breeders being trained in academic programs. Participants meet for six sessions over two years. Readings and exercises continue between sessions via internet to allow participants to maintain their current positions while being involved in the course. Plant Breeding Academy participants, UC Davis. (photo: UC Davis)  The course is targeted toward personnel currently involved in plant breeding programs who lack the academic background in genetics theory and practice to advance as independent breeders. Current breeders who desire a refresher course or would like to broaden their expertise would also be potential participants. Plant Breeding Academy courses are taught in the U.S. (Davis, California), Europe, Asia, and Africa. New participants in Class VII This class consists of the following sixteen participants: Nicola Bacciu, KeyGene, The Netherlands Shlok Bhalinge, Namdeo Umaji Agritech, India Jay Bost, GoFarm Hawaii/University of Hawaii, USA Barbara Chaves, BASF, Belgium Andy Dumbleton, PGG Wrightson Seeds, New Zealand Ken Foster, Kennan Corporation, USA Christopher Haire, Nuseed, Australia Jorge F. Jimenez, Bejo Seeds, USA Tomohiro Maeda, Nippon Del Monte, Japan Arturo Manzo, 3 Star Lettuce, USA Bianca Martins, BASF, Germany Andres Navarro Munoz, HM-Clause, USA Riccardo Padula, Tokita Sementi Italia, Italy Michael Safina, Duda Farm Fresh Foods, USA John Sheedy, Chia Tai, Thailand Souichi Urashimo, Takii, Japan For more information on the Plant Breeding Academy, contact Joy Patterson at jpatterson@ucdavis.edu or visit http://pba.ucdavis.edu The Seed Biotechnology Center was established at UC Davis in 1999 to mobilize the research, educational and outreach resources of the University of California in partnership with the seed and biotechnology industries, and to facilitate discovery and commercialization of new seed technologies for agricultural and consumer benefits. Seed Biotechnology Center @UCDavisSBC - - - - - - - - - - [For past Plant Sciences news, go to https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/]"> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "Contributing to fill a critical need for trained plant breeders, the University of California, Davis, Plant Breeding AcademySM (PBA) started its seventh class of students this week with a session in Davis, California. Over the next two years this class will spend more than 300 hours in classes, workshops and the field, training to complete this premium professional certification program." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>Contributing to fill a critical need for trained plant breeders, the University of California, Davis, <a href="http://pba.ucdavis.edu/">Plant Breeding Academy</a>SM (PBA) started its seventh class of students this week with a session in Davis, California. Over the next two years this class will spend more than 300 hours in classes, workshops and the field, training to complete this premium professional certification program.</p> <p>The Plant Breeding Academy is a premium professional development program designed to develop and enhance the skills of industry personnel around the world to enable them to become independent plant breeders or to contribute to larger breeding programs. The two-year course addresses the reduced numbers of plant breeders being trained in academic programs. Participants meet for six sessions over two years. Readings and exercises continue between sessions via internet to allow participants to maintain their current positions while being involved in the course.</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Plant Breeding Academy" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="e6f27893-d8e9-4753-8772-19133195025b" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0206.2a%20PBA%20class%20VII.jpg" /><figcaption>Plant Breeding Academy participants, UC Davis. (photo: UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p> </p> <p>The course is targeted toward personnel currently involved in plant breeding programs who lack the academic background in genetics theory and practice to advance as independent breeders. Current breeders who desire a refresher course or would like to broaden their expertise would also be potential participants.</p> <p>Plant Breeding Academy courses are taught in the U.S. (Davis, California), Europe, Asia, and Africa.</p> <p><strong>New participants in Class VII</strong></p> <p>This class consists of the following sixteen participants:</p> <ul><li><strong>Nicola Bacciu</strong>, KeyGene, The Netherlands</li> <li><strong>Shlok Bhalinge</strong>, Namdeo Umaji Agritech, India</li> <li><strong>Jay Bost</strong>, GoFarm Hawaii/University of Hawaii, USA</li> <li><strong>Barbara Chaves</strong>, BASF, Belgium</li> <li><strong>Andy Dumbleton</strong>, PGG Wrightson Seeds, New Zealand</li> <li><strong>Ken Foster</strong>, Kennan Corporation, USA</li> <li><strong>Christopher Haire</strong>, Nuseed, Australia</li> <li><strong>Jorge F. Jimenez</strong>, Bejo Seeds, USA</li> <li><strong>Tomohiro Maeda</strong>, Nippon Del Monte, Japan</li> <li><strong>Arturo Manzo</strong>, 3 Star Lettuce, USA</li> <li><strong>Bianca Martins</strong>, BASF, Germany</li> <li><strong>Andres Navarro Munoz</strong>, HM-Clause, USA</li> <li><strong>Riccardo Padula</strong>, Tokita Sementi Italia, Italy</li> <li><strong>Michael Safina</strong>, Duda Farm Fresh Foods, USA</li> <li><strong>John Sheedy</strong>, Chia Tai, Thailand</li> <li><strong>Souichi Urashimo</strong>, Takii, Japan</li> </ul><p><img alt="Plant Breeding Academy logo" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5f38c942-5564-4af6-8585-407e772a4760" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0206.5c%20200%20px_0.jpg" class="align-right" />For more information on the Plant Breeding Academy, contact Joy Patterson at <a href="mailto:jpatterson@ucdavis.edu">jpatterson@ucdavis.edu</a> or visit <a href="http://pba.ucdavis.edu">http://pba.ucdavis.edu</a></p> <p><em>The Seed Biotechnology Center was established </em><em>at UC Davis in 1999 to mobilize the research, educational and outreach resources of the University of California in partnership with the seed and biotechnology industries, and to </em><em>facilitate discovery and commercialization of new seed technologies for agricultural and consumer benefits. </em></p> <p><em>Seed Biotechnology Center @UCDavisSBC</em></p> <p class="MsoNormal">- - - - - - - - - -</p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em>For past Plant Sciences news, go to <a href="https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/</a></em>]</p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/breeding" hreflang="en">Breeding</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/agriculture" hreflang="en">Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/breeding" hreflang="en">Breeding</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/genetics" hreflang="en">Genetics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/genomics" hreflang="en">Genomics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/outreach" hreflang="en">Outreach</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students-and-education" hreflang="en">Students and education</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 14 Sep 2018 22:48:58 +0000 Ann Filmer 13176 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu What Can We Do About Climate Change? https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/what-can-we-do-about-climate-change <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">What Can We Do About Climate Change?</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 13, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0205.3aa%20jpeg.jpg?h=d18f17b4&amp;itok=5wAVn-XR" width="1280" height="720" alt="Bristlecone pine trees" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="With the Global Climate Action Summit occurring this week in San Francisco, it’s time for an update on UC Davis’ broad expertise in climate change. What Can I Do About Climate Change? Bristlecone pine trees grow on soils and in conditions where few other species can live. But limber pines in the Great Basin region, are beginning to give them some competition. (photo: Brian Smithers, UC Davis)UC Davis has launched a new blog featured on its Science &amp; Climate website called “What Can I Do About Climate Change?” centered on actions, big and small, individuals can take in their lives to address climate change. “What Can I Do About Climate Change?” is geared to individuals and how we can all make a difference, including topics such as telecommuting, fire control, food waste, and bicycling. Topics will continue to be added, including plant-focused actions. Science &amp; Climate Website The main Science &amp; Climate website covers Science, Impacts, and Solutions. Some of the articles that pertain to plant sciences include: Native wildflowers bank on seeds underground to endure drought Earth’s oldest trees in climate-induced race up the tree line How much drought can a forest take? High-severity wildfires complicate natural regeneration for California conifers Bringing more irrigation and climate-smart farming to Guatemala Marina LaForgia, a UC Davis grad. student, at her field site at McLaughlin Natural Reserve. (photo: Sasha Vafaei, UC Davis)Climate Change Experts A new campus listing with a Climate Change Experts List includes these categories: Atmospheric and climate science Wildfire, smoke and air quality Water Energy and transportation Agriculture in a changing climate Wildlife, conservation and infectious diseases Climate change and community resilience Experts from Plant Sciences include Arnold Bloom, Kent Bradford, Charlie Brummer, Mary Cadenasso, Amelie Gaudin, Andrew Latimer, Malcolm North, Leslie Roche, Ken Tate, and Gail Taylor. (Article by Ann Filmer, Dept. of Plant Sciences, with content from Kat Kerlin and Dana Topousis, both in Strategic Communications at UC Davis.) - - - - - - - - - - [For past Plant Sciences news, go to https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/] Miguel Isaias Sanchez farms with drip irrigation (and a water tower) using information he learned from the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s project in Guatemala. (photo: Elizabeth Mitcham, UC Davis) "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "With the Global Climate Action Summit occurring this week in San Francisco, it’s time for an update on UC Davis’ broad expertise in climate change. What Can I Do About Climate Change?" } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>With the <a href="https://www.globalclimateactionsummit.org/">Global Climate Action Summit</a> occurring this week in San Francisco, it’s time for an update on UC Davis’ broad expertise in climate change.</p> <p><strong>What Can I Do About Climate Change?</strong></p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="Bristlecone pine trees" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="cb52f043-0423-4984-8c02-0ff5e9bef2cc" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0205.4c%20600%20px%20wide.jpg" /><figcaption>Bristlecone pine trees grow on soils and in conditions where few other species can live. But limber pines in the Great Basin region, are beginning to give them some competition. (photo: Brian Smithers, UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p>UC Davis has launched a new blog featured on its Science &amp; Climate website called “<a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/what-can-i-do-about-climate-change/">What Can I Do About Climate Change?</a>” centered on actions, big and small, individuals can take in their lives to address climate change.</p> <p>“What Can I Do About Climate Change?” is geared to individuals and how we can all make a difference, including topics such as telecommuting, fire control, food waste, and bicycling. Topics will continue to be added, including plant-focused actions.</p> <p><strong>Science &amp; Climate Website</strong></p> <p>The main <a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/">Science &amp; Climate website</a> covers Science, Impacts, and Solutions.</p> <p>Some of the articles that pertain to plant sciences include:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/news/native-wildflowers-bank-seeds-underground-endure-drought/">Native wildflowers bank on seeds underground to endure drought</a></li> <li><a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/news/earths-oldest-trees-climate-induced-race-tree-line/">Earth’s oldest trees in climate-induced race up the tree line</a></li> <li><a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/news/much-drought-can-forest-take/">How much drought can a forest take?</a></li> <li><a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/news/high-severity-wildfires-complicate-natural-regeneration-california-conifers/">High-severity wildfires complicate natural regeneration for California conifers</a></li> <li><a href="https://climatechange.ucdavis.edu/news/bringing-irrigation-climate-smart-farming-guatemala/">Bringing more irrigation and climate-smart farming to Guatemala</a></li> </ul><figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-left"><img alt="Graduate student Marina LaForgia" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="7977600e-891f-4431-ad6f-daf66fc4efaf" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0205.2b%20600%20px%20wide.jpg" /><figcaption>Marina LaForgia, a UC Davis grad. student, at her field site at McLaughlin Natural Reserve. (photo: Sasha Vafaei, UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p><strong>Climate Change Experts</strong></p> <p>A new campus listing with a <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/climate-change-experts-list">Climate Change Experts List</a> includes these categories:</p> <p><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/experts-climate-science-and-atmosphere">Atmospheric and climate science</a></p> <ul><li><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/climate-change-experts-wildfire-smoke-and-air-quality">Wildfire, smoke and air quality</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/experts-climate-change-and-water">Water</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/climate-change-experts-energy-and-transportation">Energy and transportation</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/experts-agriculture-changing-climate">Agriculture in a changing climate</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/climate-change-experts-wildlife-infectious-diseases-and-one-health">Wildlife, conservation and infectious diseases</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/experts-climate-change-and-community-resilience">Climate change and community resilience</a></li> </ul><p>Experts from <a href="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/plantsciences/">Plant Sciences</a> include Arnold Bloom, Kent Bradford, Charlie Brummer, Mary Cadenasso, Amelie Gaudin, Andrew Latimer, Malcolm North, Leslie Roche, Ken Tate, and Gail Taylor.</p> <p>(<em>Article by <a href="mailto:afilmer@ucdavis.edu">Ann Filmer</a>, Dept. of Plant Sciences, with content from <a href="mailto:kekerlin@ucdavis.edu">Kat Kerlin</a> and <a href="mailto:dtopousis@ucdavis.edu">Dana Topousis</a>, both in Strategic Communications at UC Davis.</em>)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">- - - - - - - - - -</p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em>For past Plant Sciences news, go to <a href="https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/</a></em>]</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-right"><img alt="miguel Isaias Sanchez farming" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="749373e9-629d-464b-a964-1d74cc885e16" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0205.5b%20550%20px.jpg" /><figcaption>Miguel Isaias Sanchez farms with drip irrigation (and a water tower) using information he learned from the Horticulture Innovation Lab’s project in Guatemala. (photo: Elizabeth Mitcham, UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p> </p></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate change</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/department-news" hreflang="en">Department news</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/environmental-impacts" hreflang="en">Environmental impacts</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/expert-lists" hreflang="en">Expert lists</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/fire" hreflang="en">Fire</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/uc-davis-news" hreflang="en">UC Davis news</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/water-0" hreflang="en">Water</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 13 Sep 2018 22:15:51 +0000 Ann Filmer 13171 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu UC Davis Collects 2 More Top 10 Rankings: 4th Top 10 Finish in a Month https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/news/uc-davis-collects-2-more-top-10-rankings-4th-top-10-finish-month <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">UC Davis Collects 2 More Top 10 Rankings: 4th Top 10 Finish in a Month</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"> <span lang="" about="/user/5706" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Ann Filmer</span> </span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">September 10, 2018</span> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-primary-image field--type-image field--label-hidden field__item"> <img src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/styles/sf_landscape_16x9/public/images/article/0204.2c%20photo%20for%20text.jpg?h=2a768967&amp;itok=XEM7J9p3" width="1280" height="720" alt="students riding bikes on campus" typeof="foaf:Image" class="image-style-sf-landscape-16x9" /> </div> <div class="addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style addthis_32x32_style" addthis:url="https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/articles.rss" addthis:title="Recent Articles" addthis:description="As the new academic year approaches, University of California, Davis, students will have even more reasons for school pride — two more prestigious top 10 rankings. Today (Sept. 10, 2018), U.S. News &amp; World Report announced its annual “Best Colleges” ranking, with UC Davis tied for 10th (with the College of William and Mary in Virginia) among public universities in the country. The overall rankings are based on mission, academic excellence and overall scores. Also among the rankings released today by U.S. News are: Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs. UC Davis ranked 32nd overall among the 206 programs examined (among those who offer up to a Ph.D.), while ranking fourth in the field of biological and agricultural engineering. Most Innovative Schools. In its fourth year, this peer assessment ranking looks at innovative improvements colleges and universities make related to curriculum, faculty, students, campus life, technology and facilities. UC Davis tied for 24th for this honor. It is the first time the university has made this list. Best Colleges for Veterans. Based on enrollment of veterans and benefits for both veterans and active-duty military that make obtaining a college education more affordable, the university ranks 16th among national universities. Ethnic and Economic Diversity. Among its peer group of national universities, UC Davis came in at 17th of those schools whose undergraduates are most likely to benefit from interaction with those from different backgrounds. “It’s clear that UC Davis is on an upward trajectory with its strong placements in recent rankings,” said Chancellor Gary S. May. “Our academic and research excellence, along with our ability to be a social escalator for students of all backgrounds, makes UC Davis a top choice. We&#039;re setting up our students for real success as they enter an increasingly diverse and global workforce.” [Added note: UC Davis remains No. 1 globally in Plant and Animal Science, according to U.S. News &amp; World Report] UC Davis earns two more top 10 rankings (photo: UC Davis)More accolades Last week, UC Davis was fifth among public universities in the U.S. in the Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education’s annual ranking, up from its sixth place ranking the previous year. Once again, the strength of the UC system was evidenced with four of its nine undergraduate campuses in the top 10. According to the outlets, the methodology is straightforward and focuses on “two crucial factors: the outcomes students can expect from their college education and the resources schools deploy on academics.” Twenty-four public schools were ranked among the top 100 schools, up from just 21 last year. While funding resources are often less than seen at private institutions, students are receiving excellent, well-rounded educations at public colleges and universities. As UC Davis Provost Ralph J. Hexter told the Wall Street Journal, “There is no question there are many more larger classes here than at the superelite private schools. But students can find a niche here; we feel they are getting a tremendous education.” In August, UC Davis earned a top 10 spot among public and private institutions in Washington Monthly’s 2018 ranking. The publication recognizes “not what colleges do for themselves, but on what they do for the country,” and rates its schools on three criteria: research, social mobility and public service. Money Magazine also recognized the university in August in its “Best Colleges” and “Most Transformative Colleges” annual rankings. UC Davis ranked eighth among public schools and 11th overall among 727 schools across the country. Media contact: Kimberly Hale, UC Davis News and Media Relations, 530-752-9838, klhale@ucdavis.edu (By Kimberly Hale on September 10, 2018 in University News) - - - - - - - - - - [For past Plant Sciences news, go to https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/]   "> <a class="addthis_button_facebook"></a> <script> var addthis_share = { templates: { twitter: "As the new academic year approaches, University of California, Davis, students will have even more reasons for school pride — two more prestigious top 10 rankings. Today (Sept. 10, 2018), U.S. News &amp;amp; World Report announced its annual “Best Colleges” ranking, with UC Davis tied for 10th (with the College of William and Mary in Virginia) among public universities in the country. The overall rankings are based on mission, academic excellence and overall scores." } } </script> <a class="addthis_button_twitter"></a> <a class="addthis_button_google_plusone_share"></a> <a class="addthis_button_email"></a> <a class="addthis_button_compact"></a> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p>As the new academic year approaches, University of California, Davis, students will have even more reasons for school pride — two more prestigious top 10 rankings.</p> <p>Today (Sept. 10, 2018), <a href="https://www.usnews.com/"><em>U.S. News &amp; World Report</em></a> announced its annual “Best Colleges” ranking, with UC Davis tied for 10th (with the College of William and Mary in Virginia) among public universities in the country. The overall rankings are based on mission, academic excellence and overall scores.</p> <p>Also among the rankings released today by <em>U.S. News</em> are:</p> <ul><li><strong>Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs.</strong> UC Davis ranked 32nd overall among the 206 programs examined (among those who offer up to a Ph.D.), while ranking fourth in the field of biological and agricultural engineering.</li> <li><strong>Most Innovative Schools.</strong> In its fourth year, this peer assessment ranking looks at innovative improvements colleges and universities make related to curriculum, faculty, students, campus life, technology and facilities. UC Davis tied for 24th for this honor. It is the first time the university has made this list.</li> <li><strong>Best Colleges for Veterans.</strong> Based on enrollment of veterans and benefits for both veterans and active-duty military that make obtaining a college education more affordable, the university ranks 16th among national universities.</li> <li><strong>Ethnic and Economic Diversity.</strong> Among its peer group of national universities, UC Davis came in at 17th of those schools whose undergraduates are most likely to benefit from interaction with those from different backgrounds.</li> </ul><p>“It’s clear that UC Davis is on an upward trajectory with its strong placements in recent rankings,” said Chancellor Gary S. May. “Our academic and research excellence, along with our ability to be a social escalator for students of all backgrounds, makes UC Davis a top choice. We're setting up our students for real success as they enter an increasingly diverse and global workforce.”</p> <p>[Added note: UC Davis remains No. 1 globally in Plant and Animal Science, according to <em><a href="http://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/2017/10/26/uc-davis-is-ranked-no-1-globally-in-plant-and-animal-science/">U.S. News &amp; World Report</a></em>]</p> <figure role="group" class="caption caption-img align-center"><img alt="Students riding bikes on campus" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dfd6f516-e06c-4dad-8f09-1dbf9f83e56a" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0204.2c%20photo%20for%20text_0.jpg" /><figcaption>UC Davis earns two more top 10 rankings (photo: UC Davis)</figcaption></figure><p><strong>More accolades</strong></p> <p>Last week, UC Davis was fifth among public universities in the U.S. in the <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/public-schools-make-gains-in-wsj-the-college-rankings-1536188663"><em>Wall Street Journal </em>and <em>Times Higher Education</em>’s</a> annual ranking, up from its sixth place ranking the previous year. Once again, the strength of the UC system was evidenced with four of its nine undergraduate campuses in the top 10.</p> <p>According to the outlets, the methodology is straightforward and focuses on “two crucial factors: the outcomes students can expect from their college education and the resources schools deploy on academics.”</p> <p>Twenty-four public schools were ranked among the top 100 schools, up from just 21 last year. While funding resources are often less than seen at private institutions, students are receiving excellent, well-rounded educations at public colleges and universities. As UC Davis Provost Ralph J. Hexter told the <em>Wall Street Journal</em>, “There is no question there are many more larger classes here than at the superelite private schools. But students can find a niche here; we feel they are getting a tremendous education.”</p> <p>In August, UC Davis earned a top 10 spot among public and private institutions in <a href="https://washingtonmonthly.com/2018college-guide"><em>Washington Monthly</em>’s 2018 ranking</a>. The publication recognizes “not what colleges do for themselves, but on what they do for the country,” and rates its schools on three criteria: research, social mobility and public service.</p> <p><em>Money Magazine</em> also recognized the university in August in its “Best Colleges” and “Most Transformative Colleges” <a href="http://time.com/money/best-colleges/">annual rankings</a>. UC Davis ranked eighth among public schools and 11th overall among 727 schools across the country.</p> <p><strong>Media contact:</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/person/articles/22084">Kimberly Hale</a>, UC Davis News and Media Relations, 530-752-9838, <a href="mailto:klhale@ucdavis.edu">klhale@ucdavis.edu</a></p> <p>(<em>By Kimberly Hale on September 10, 2018 in <a href="https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/university-news">University News</a></em>)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">- - - - - - - - - -</p> <p class="MsoNormal">[<em>For past Plant Sciences news, go to <a href="https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/">https://news.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu/</a></em>]</p> <div><img alt="Rankings data" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3f3a994f-0a0d-4e20-b56a-d75a63598e5e" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0204.3b%20AggieTipSheet_SE-Rankings5_Page_1.jpg" class="align-center" /><p> </p> <img alt="Rankings data" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="c5df33a6-d0f6-443c-9f1f-129a2290bdd1" src="/sites/g/files/dgvnsk1736/files/inline-images/0204.3b%20AggieTipSheet_SE-Rankings5_Page_2.jpg" class="align-center" /></div></div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-article-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Category</div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/articles/awards-and-rankings" hreflang="en">Awards and rankings</a></div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-sf-tags field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Tags</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/awards-and-rankings" hreflang="en">Awards and rankings</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/students-and-education" hreflang="en">Students and education</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="/tags/uc-davis-news" hreflang="en">UC Davis news</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 10 Sep 2018 21:44:58 +0000 Ann Filmer 13166 at https://www.plantsciences.ucdavis.edu